Lighted Wall

“What Is A House Church?” ~ Vision Proper For The Tribe of Expressions

What is a House Church?” This is probably the most common question I get asked when people hear that I am a House Church leader in The Edge. I think one of the common mistakes we make in answering comes when we see House Churches as a model rather then an organic community of people. We say, “We are trying to…”

  • “… be like the 1st century house churches.”
  • “… be less organizational.”
  • “… just do life with friends and family.”
  • “… do church smaller within our homes and living rooms.”
  • “… be a simple small group.”

Family on MissionWhen we really look at what being a house church is, our intentions are not to follow a model or even past example, it is really to be a closely knit spiritual family who are covenanted in the mission of God together! We are a 21st century gathering of people who wish to live as Christ within the Kingdom of God as it reveals itself in our homes, neighbourhoods, and surrounding communities!! We can call ourselves a tribe when we find ourselves interlinked in the journey of shared discipleship with one another in the desire to be like Jesus in the world today!

In any house church, there is always two shaping perceptions which catalyze their movement – their Vision Proper and the Practical Community Rhythms they create around it. A tribe’s vision proper, as Dave Rhodes expresses[1], is really the ideals and hopes they see God calling them towards. It is “the way things are meant to be” and the essential building blocks which we perceive to be in any Christian discipling community. The practical community rhythms created around that vision are really the mission statement, values, strategies, and measures each tribe begins to create and practice that move them towards that calling. In the simplest terms, the first addresses the question, “What is God calling us to, or saying to us?“; while the second speaks to the question “What are we going to do about it?

As part of the Edge House Church Movement, the Expressions Tribe follows a vision proper to which every house church in its membership strives towards. We believe ‘To Live Is Christ‘ (Phil. 1:21) and that we seek to live that out through Loving God, Loving People, and Making Disciples. But we also recognize the autonomous contexts and cultures to which each house church may find themselves in through their own unique local community and the language to which they find meaningful. In this way, the Expressions Tribe has found their own reflection of The Edge’s vision through the mission of ‘Seeking Expressions of Jesus as Lord in Life and Community‘, practiced through the practical community rhythms of Invitational, Incarnational, and Inspirational Living. While we will look at these practical community rhythms in future posts, this post is really looking at the vision proper for Expressions and the essential building blocks or mDNA (Missional DNA) we look for in our lives as disciples.

Five Irreducible Minimums

In his greater work ‘The Forgotten Ways‘, Alan Hirsch identifies five irreducible minimums to a missional movement. As he shares, these five minimums should be present in any gathering tribe to bring purpose and significance to their movement. Expressions has found these minimums as reflective in our own mDNA as a house church with the hopes of others embracing them as essential to their own growth in identity as House Church’s who are a part of God’s calling.

It is important to realize that these minimums are ideal in there expression, which is why they are part of our vision proper and seen as the hopes we feel called by God to grow in as we journey through both personal and communal discipleship. In no way is any of our members expected to be perfect in expressing or practicing all the minimums or essentials in perfect balance. They are simply visional goals we can strive towards in balance as the practice of each can bring fruitful growth both to our personal lives and the community we are a part of.

Centred on Jesus ~ ‘Expressions of Jesus as Lord’

Jesus is LordAt its deepest core Expressions seeks to centre its mission on ‘Seeking Expressions of Jesus as Lord in Life and Community’. It is here that all our tribal movement begins. Jesus is calling all of us to answer the question of “Who do you say that I am?[2] The answers to which we give are not so much in the words we share or the spoken statements we make but rather shown in the lives we live and the community which we journey with. It is an identity we take up in which we hope to become more like Jesus in everything we do. As Leslie Newbigin states, “The confession ‘Jesus is Lord’ implies a commitment to make good that confession in relation to the whole life of the world – its philosophy, its culture, and its politics no less than the personal lives of its people. The Christian mission is thus to act out in the whole life of the whole world the confession that Jesus is Lord of all.[3]

It is important to note however that as God’s creation we are not in possession of that mission on our own but rather that God’s mission possesses us. We do not start with the church being that which defines our missional identity but rather the character, life, and being of Jesus is the central identifying bases for everything we do as a church community. By this I mean that it is not our mission to fulfill every desired wish we ourselves have for this world but rather it is God’s mission we are to witness and proclaim to the world as we participate in it. A man named Christopher Wright wrote it in the words that, “It is not so much the case that God has a mission for his church in the world, as that God has a church for his mission in the world. Mission was not made for the church; the church was made for mission – God’s mission.[4]

When Expressions missional center is on ‘Seeking Expressions of Jesus as Lord in Life and Community‘, we find ourselves propelled outwards into the world while imitating Jesus in everything we do through the practical understanding and acting out of something we call (I)Living ~ Invitational, Incarnational, and Inspirational Living. How exactly can we do this? What practical steps can we take in acting these rhythms out? This will be explored in future posts but first, let’s briefly look at the vision proper for these three practical rhythms.

Worship ~ ‘Invitational Living’

Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.[5] You cannot help but hear Jesus’ words and be drawn into there focus on righteous worship through Loving God and responding to His Invitation when hearing His commandment. But why did Jesus start with the word “love”?

Love in practice is meant to be more then just an expression of individual personal affection towards another as we reflect its passionate nature in heart, soul, mind, and strength. It is a relational tension that is felt and encountered between people as it binds them together holistically through shared experiences in life. These moments of binding tension articulate the boundaries of any relationship as well as the freedoms, expressions, and practices within it. While we grow to recognize our desires and tensions in responding to God’s invitation, we find personal and communal ways of expressing and showing that practice through Listening, Learning, and Living in obedience to His voice and presence as we encounter Him amidst our daily lives.

By creating environments, spaces, and practices of Invitational Living we are in the hopes of finding sanctuaries to which God can commune with us in, “a place of reflection and renewal, where you can listen to yourself away from the dance floor and the blare of the music, where you can reaffirm your deeper sense of self and purpose.”[6]

Mission ~ ‘Incarnational Living’

You shall love your neighbour as yourself.[7] Words which drive us to Love People unconditionally and not just those who we recognize, but all people regardless of their differences. Embracing a life of Incarnating the likeness of Jesus within ourselves we strive in every moment to live in servanthood towards self stewardship and for others through renewing, reconciling, and resurrecting the significance of all relationships and creation. It is our experience in this practice that we recognize, “most people needed to feel a sense of belonging before they believed. And they needed acceptance before they could even begin to understand what repentance or transformation might look like. When you invite the messiness of broken humanity, you also invite amazing grace.[8]

Incarnational LivingAt first glance, loving our neighbour seems like a second command that Jesus is giving us following his first to love God. Yet in actuality Jesus really sees them as one complete direction. We cannot fully love God and recognize His invitation without loving our neighbours and his creation too by incarnating and reflecting His image within ourselves. In essence, understanding God in Word is only one side of the coin while loving people in action and incarnated deed is the other.

Renewing our minds and bodies with those parts of our lives that have been marginalized or often forgotten about leads us to the very far reaches of our personal and social identities. As we engage and enflesh a sense of Christ-likeness within these relationships, we embody a holistic act of Reconciliation to the other in the hopes of bringing a lasting experience of Resurrection and restoration to newness of life in ourselves and the community we are a part of.

Discipleship ~ ‘Inspirational Living’

Being a part of God’s mission also has the deeper calling to “make disciples of all nations“.[9] Living an Inspirational life we strive to Invest and challenge others to enter a covenant of discipleship with us as we seek to become more like Jesus together, Involving and intertwining themselves as a living gospel into a world where the Kingdom of God and His authority has drawn near, while continuing to Inspire others who have not heard God’s calling and story. It is as Pat Keifert writes, “about initiating persons into the reign of God through evangelism and a deliberate spiritual journey that takes [them] from being Seekers (consumers of religion as commodity) to being disciples of Jesus.[10]

The life of discipleship in the Expressions Tribe takes on a radical meaning which is often missed in the traditional church. We do not look for people to join us in simple membership but rather we seek those who are willing to engage with us in the discipleship journey of ‘Imitating Jesus‘ in all of life through their own expressions of Invitational, Incarnational, and Inspirational Living! As Hirsch states, “For the follower of Jesus, discipleship is not the first step toward a promising career. It is in itself the fulfilment of his or her destiny.[11]

A Covenant Community

Expressions I LivingThe gathering of any Christian missional community must find itself united through more then just common affiliation and/or curriculum. These four essentials or irreducible minimums in balance come together to form the fifth essential which as a whole is a communal responsibility towards each other that becomes more an accountability to each member then just a relaxed tie that can be broken simply by “not showing up” or ceasing to attend. As Alan Hirsch points out, “A church is formed people not by people just hanging out together, but ones bound together in a distinctive bound. There is a certain obligation toward one another formed around a covenant.[12]

It is true that being in covenant cannot be considered lightly in significance. But, that is the point! Our relationships in being a part of God’s mission is of great significance both to God and each other! The bounds formed between tribal members become intertwined both personally and communally. In some sense, we become a family as Jesus shared, “My mother and my brothers are those who hear the word of God and do it.[13]

The language to describe this bound is difficult to find but, I think Desmond Tutu touched on it when he wrote about the African understanding of ubuntu. He shares that:

“My humanity is caught up, is inextricably bound up, in yours.” We belong in a bundle of life. We say, “A person is a person through other persons.” It is not, “I think therefore I am.” It says rather: “I am human because I belong. I participate, I share.” A person with ubuntu is open and available to others, affirming of others, does not feel threatened that others are able and good, for he or she has a proper self-assurance that comes from knowing that he or she belongs in a greater whole and is diminished when others are humiliated or diminished, when others are tortured or oppressed, or treated as if they were less than who they are.”[14]

Covenantal life is not always easy but it is also the catalyst for the movement of any one tribe or house church and its members. In its best expression a tribal covenant is practiced by every member both personally and as a community while it details some of the practicalities and strategies of all four of the other vision proper essentials. There is much more that can be shared and conversed about in the way of covenant living being shaped through practical community rhythms which we will explore in a separate post towards the end of our journey.

Conclusion ~ Creating a Space For Tribal Gathering and Future Discussions

Knowing that a House Church is defined by the presence of these five essentials and the people who put them into practice helps us to see that the church is never defined by the building in which it gathers, but rather what its members bring to the gathering itself. Whether these people gather in a park, a community centre, a theatre, a mall, a coffee shop or restaurant, or the living room of someone’s home is not what is important. At the very heart of these community’s and tribe’s that we call a “House Church” is a named identity not because they gather in a house but because they exist as a household, a family unit that has been called and sent into God’s mission together.

“But as for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.” ~ Joshua 24:15

With a vision proper now laid out for the Expressions Tribe and an understanding of what it is God is calling us to, we are ready to turn to the practical community rhythms which shape how we live it out. Over the next series of posts we will explore some of the practical ways we might be able to fulfill these five essentials. While we see Covenant Living being the essential which ties it all together, we’ll first look at the formation of a mission statement and Expressions declaration ‘Seeking Expressions of Jesus as Lord in Life and Community‘, followed by our rhythms of Invitational, Incarnational, and Inspirational Living.

While I’ve tried to keep this post in the simplest language I could, I realize there may still be questions on its points. So ask away! Let’s keep the dialogue going and whether it is over coffee in person or in a comment below, I hope together we can follow Jesus as Lord in every expression His mission takes!!


[2] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (Matt. 16:13-20). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[3] Newbigin, Leslie. The Open Secret: An Introduction Into The Theology of Mission. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1995), Kindle LOC #232.

[4] Wright, Christopher J. H. The Mission of God’s People: A Biblical Theology of the Church’s Mission. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan, 2010), Kindle LOC #155.

[5] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (Mk 12:29–30). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[6] Heifetz, Ronald A., and Martin Linsky. Leadership On the Line: Staying Alive Through the Dangers of Leading. (Boston, Massatusses: Harvard Business School Press, 2002) Kindle LOC #3111

[7] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (Mk 12:31). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[8] Hirsch, Deb. Redeeming Sex: Naked Conversations About Sexuality and Spirituality. Downers Grove, Illinois: Inter Varsity Press, 2015) Kindle LOC #159.

[9] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (Matt. 28:19). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[10] Keifert, Patrick. We Are Here Now: A Missional Journey of Spiritual Discovery, (St. Paul, Minnesota: Church Innovations Institute, 2006), Pg. 126.

[11] Hirsch, Alan. The Forgotten Ways: Reactivating the Missional Church. (Grand Rapids, MI: Brazos Press, 2006) Pg. #103.

[12] Hirsch, Alan. The Forgotten Ways: Reactivating the Missional Church. (Grand Rapids, MI: Brazos Press, 2006) Pg. #40-41.

[13] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (Lk 8:21). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[14] Tutu, Desmond. No Future Without Forgiveness:. (New York: Doubleday, 1999) Kindle LOC #431.

A Deep Gaze Into Missional Theology and The Eschatological Gleanings From Them ~ Pt. #5 ~ Fun Houses and the True Identity of the Ekklesia

Funny MirrorsAs a boy I used to love going to the local fair and exploring the fun houses and the glass maze. I would sometimes spend hours feeling my way through the glass and mirrors till I reached the top of the house and the maze broke way to a large open room filled with funny mirrors. They were curved and warped so that when I stood in front of them they would distort my image and I’d look really short and fat or tall and super skinny. I’d laugh with my friends, point at their funny images, and strike poses for my own amusement.

Looking back, there was a certain degree of reality within those moments in the fun houses. Paul shares with the church in Corinth that, “When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways. 12 For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face.”[1] He was articulating that as we grow in the maturity of Christ, we do not fully comprehend all that the Kingdom of God wishes us to see and as such we need the relationship of likeminded disciples around us who can be, “a sign, instrument, and foretaste of the reign of God.”[2] This is the birthplace for ekklesia.

Ekklesia being a Greek word comprised of two sub-words; Ek which means “out”, and Klesia which means “called”. Together they mean the “called out ones” and it is often referring to the church.[3] The church therefore is found through the binding together of disciples as they naturally form covenant bonds of communal mutual rhythms in life. As Wright articulates it, “it comes about as people worship the God in whose image they are made, as they follow the Lord who bore their sins and rose from the dead, as they are indwelt by his Spirit and thereby given new life, a new way of life, a new zest for life.[4]

The role of the church is not in its own service but rather for the benefit of the whole world. “The power of the gospel lies not in the offer of a new spirituality or religious experience,” Wright continues, “not in the threat of hellfire (certainly not in the threat of being “left behind”), which can be removed if only the hearer checks this box, says this prayer, raises a hand, or whatever, but in the powerful announcement that God is God, that Jesus is Lord, that the powers of evil have been defeated, that God’s new world has begun.[5] The expression of Jesus as Lord can of course be diverse and numerousas it spreads across the imaginations and creative landscapes of Jesus’ followers.

In his book ‘The Mission of God’s People’, Christopher Wright points to a recognized loss where the church in the last course of history has seemed to of misplaced its understanding of being the “sent ones” into the world and instead interpreted election to be about self gratification and aggrandizement. Closing in my thoughts to the understanding of the church’s identity I’d like to share his prophetic insight as we reimagine what it means to be God’s true ekklesia and “sent ones” to the world. He writes:

“Election of one is not the rejection of the rest, but ultimately for their benefit. It is as if a group of trapped cave explorers choose one of their number to squeeze through a narrow flooded passage to get out to the surface and call for help. The point of the choice is not so that she alone gets saved, but that she is able to bring help and equipment to ensure the rest get rescued. ‘Election’ in such a case is an instrumental choice of one for the sake of many.

In the same way, God’s election of Israel is instrumental in God’s mission for all nations. Election needs to be seen as a doctrine of mission, not a calculus for the arithmetic of salvation. If we are to speak of being chosen, of being among God’s elect, it is to say that, like Abraham, we are chosen for the sake of God’s plan that the nations of the world come to enjoy the blessing of Abraham (which is exactly how Paul describes the effect of God’s redemption of Israel through Christ in Gal. 3:14).”[6]

[1] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (1 Co 13:11–12). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[2] Newbigin, Leslie. The Open Secret: An Introduction Into The Theology of Mission. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1995) Kindle LOC #1520


[4] Wright, N. T. Surprised By Hope: Rethinking Heaven, The Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church. (New York, New York: Harper Collins, 2008.) Kindle LOC #3591.

[5] Wright, N. T. Surprised By Hope: Rethinking Heaven, The Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church. (New York, New York: Harper Collins, 2008.) Kindle LOC #3510

[6] Wright, Christopher J. H. The Mission of God’s People: A Biblical Theology of the Church’s Mission. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan, 2010) Kindle LOC #1089.

The Edge Leadership Retreat – To Live is Christ

This past weekend was awesome as leaders from Vancouver, Vernon, Calgary, and Virden all came together as part of The Edge Movement. Together we shared stories of God’s presence and work in our tribes, visions and hopes we have had, and we spent time praying and encouraging for one another. We also explored the Covenant Vision that unites us as a movement which seeks To Live is Christ with the greatest of intentionality!!

However, not all of us were able to make it to the gathering and although it doesn’t cover it all, we have an audio recording of John as he shares our covenant in being The Edge. I will be writing about this in the coming weeks but, here is the audio from this past Edge Leadership retreat!!

Part 1

Part 2


To Live is Christ

Love God

Love People

Make Disciples

Missional Leadership Polarities

A Narration To Relational Polarities and Ritualistic Church Encounters

Church CathedralsI thought I’d begin this post with a bit of a story in my life.

I grew up in the church. Probably not the one you’re expecting. While not overly religious, my parents baptized me as an infant in the Catholic community they were a part of back in Hamilton Ontario. It would only be a few years later that my parents would divorce and my mother and I would move from Fort McMurray down to Calgary.

While divorce was not looked well upon in the Catholic denomination, particularly in the late ’70’s and ’80’s, my mother became involved with the Anglican Church cathedrals in downtown Calgary. There were many a choir practices to which she’d bring me I would spend my time as an adventuresome 4-5 year old exploring the “articulated tunnels” and the dark “catacombs” of these “long lost” church temples and cathedrals!! My imagination for the amazing stories that took place in these “ancient” buildings had no bounds!!

As I entered my school years, my mother enrolled me into the Catholic school system; while be accepted because of my catholic baptism, I could never understand why the would never allow me to participate in catholic sacraments during Mass simply because I was a part of an Anglican church and never participated in their First Communion cataclysm classes. It was all a bit prejudicial to me and I left the system the moment my mother gave me the option to go to public school in Junior High.

It was here that I really only found meaning in the church through youth groups and church camp retreats where my friends and I could hike, bike, tell ghost stories around the fire, and yes… sneak into the girls side of the camp late at night when we could slip out of the cabin unnoticed.🙂

Of course, life does not always go the way we expect it to some times and my life dramatically changed in the mid ’90’s; April 23rd, 1994 to be precise. I was 15 and I was involved in a major car wreck. I will leave the details for another time but will say that on this day my life dramatically changed. My mother passed away and although having other family members around me, I would eventually end up living life on my own through a long hospital stay, a brief single apartment, and a group home experience before entering adulthood and my own living spaces. But this is a story about church.

The years following my accident I really was not involved in the church. There was no point. My friends had long left, as the person I was no longer was the same person I became; and my family had passed away and those left were at a distance while not really holding me to any accountability to such a belief or community. It wouldn’t be until several years later that while delving deep into the Martial Art philosophies I began to question the nature of this God I was raised to believe in and told stories about.

My girl friend at the time (later to be my wife😉 ), invited me to her church, a Four Square Full Gospel community in NE Calgary. A much different encounter with the church I grew up with as I’d roll my eyes to the old lady in the seats standing up and “prophesying” AGAIN to the falling apart of the church and of course the speaking “in tongues” until she became slain in the Spirit. I’d rock to the contemporary and upbeat music which was far different from the choir led hymnals of old, and of course I’d try to keep from jumping or falling out of my chair whenever Arnie would let out one of his yelps while giving his hour long or more sermons. It was here that Bonnie and I would get married.

Moving south, we found it easier to find a home in the local North American Baptist Church of our community in McKenzie Town. It was here that I in the most sincerest way was “born again”. There is a lot that could be said theologically about this term but it was a reality in my experience where the only way I can describe it is by saying that God became alive to me here and my faith was no longer just about social community and relational friendships but rather about a relationship I had with the God who created me. Through many intimate coffees with my good friend Humphrey and the shared meals with our small group, I was led into my theological studies at a local college called Alberta Bible College. It was here that Bonnie and I were baptized while giving testimonies in front of the congregation and Norm pouring water over our heads.

Drinking deeply from the theological waters of this college campus I began an introduction to the Churches of Christ and Christian Independent community. There was more then just deep intellectual conversations in classrooms and hallways of this institution; there was the amazing epiphanies I had while reconnecting to the deeper meanings of communion that I so misunderstood as a child in the liturgical expressions of Catholicism and Anglicanism; and there was also the tears and raised voices of debate as we discussed the implications of wrongful institutionalized beliefs about baptism and whether Bonnie and I were “damned for the fires of hell” because we were not fully immersed. I couldn’t help but see the parallels to my old feelings of rejection to the sacraments in the Catholic Church as a boy. It’s ironic when you consider Thomas Campbell’s original rejection of the Catholic’s sacramental practices around the Lord’s Table!😉

Of course, this journey and story would not be complete without mentioning the visits I would make to my fathers Pentecostal community, Victory Church and the many conversations and debates we would get into on the theological understandings of healing. Even today I see the rather scared and damaging effects that journey has had on my dad and his wife. I’m thankful that even though that experience left them spiritual empty and abandoned, we are still here with them and as we listen, pray, and serve; we might be able to bring a restoration in time.

Today I serve in a House Church Movement supported by the Evangelical Missionary Churches of Canada and while I deeply struggle with the idea of denominational ties, I am greatly thankful to be a part of this community! While I do not think it is theologically “all correct”, I truly believe God is working through their endeavors to pursue His Kingdom at there utmost.

Why do I tell you this tail?! While it is riddled with holes, incomplete details, and of course still unfinished, I must confess that I have never been able to grasp the concept of the church being found in one singular denominational declaration or building institution. Church has always been a narrative journey for me and even more so, defined by the many memories and experiences of people, family and friends, who embody its impacts and works in my life and those around me.

I’m going to do something perhaps very dangerous here and say while I could leave you many quotes from Keifert’s and Mark’s writings, I think we will find those in many other posts and I’m sure I will use them in future also. I’d much rather leave you with a thought from my heart as to how we might define the church…

The church is not instituted into a singular doctrine, decree, or denomination – I think we’d all agree to this, if not at least in statement. I might even push Mark and say it is not solely in the pluralism and diversity of narrative experience. The church is the inner working of the Trinity through space and time while in relational polarity between humanities narrative exploration of his nature and the commonalities of ritual expressionism. I’m thinking to explain this more might take another few “300 word” posts!😉

I could of course be completely wrong here and ultimately rewriting this whole post, hopefully before Thursday. But I felt led to share this while writing today and I’m putting my trust in His guidance. I hope this story meets you all well. Peace be with you!

Future Steps Towards The Edge – Pt. #5 – Conclusion – Pilgrims and Fellow Sojourners in the Missio Dei


Michael Horton wrote once that,

“There is a significant origin and end point to history, within which we ourselves are cast members. It is a courtroom drama in which we are either false or true witnesses, “in Adam” or “in Christ,” justified or condemned, alive or dead.

Neither masters nor tourists, we become pilgrims.

Unlike masters, pilgrims have not arrived and they do not presume to inaugurate their own kingdoms of glory. They don’t have all the answers and they are not exactly sure what their destination city will be like; they are driven by a promise and by God’s fulfillment of his promise along the way. Yet unlike tourists, they are on their way to a settled place and every point along the way is a landmark toward that destination.”

Sojourning with the tribes of The Edge has without a doubt brought great joy in my life and as Horton points out, shown me “landmarks toward that destination” we endeavor to journey towards together. Bevans and Schroeder say that, “Christians are incorporated into the divine life and experience a foretaste of the world’s destiny of full communion with God, with one another and with all of creation.”[1] It is my hope we too will also experience this uniting communion together, so as to become all that which God wishes us to become.

My hope is in sharing this that we will see these challenges not as critiques or divisions, but as opportunities to greater engage in the mission of God as he has called upon us as one unified movement. I know that together I dream of the day that we are all Living the Life of Jesus Within the Lives of Others to The Edge and beyond this world!!

[1] Bevans, Stephen B., and Roger Schroeder. Constants in Context: A Theology of Mission for Today. (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2004) Pg. #299.

Further Steps Towards The Edge – Pt. #4 – Creating an External Vision for Dreaming Dreams and Seeing Visions

Out There“I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day this [movement] will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed:”[1] to be Living the Life of Jesus Within the Lives of Others! Ok, so I took some creative freedoms in sharing Martin Luther King’s famous words. There is such an inspiring force to them though as we contemplate the significance of dreams and visions in the mission of God. The apostle Peter knew that too, as he quoted the prophet Joel, “I will pour out my Spirit on all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams.”[2]

God’s mission is bigger then just any one movement. The old saying is true that, “It is not so much that God’s Church has a mission as much as it is that God’s mission has a church.” We cannot limit the vision of The Edge or the dreams we might have of its future solely to the internal voice of self-reason. Lesslie Newbigin writes that, “the Spirit who thus bears witness in the life of the Church to the purpose of the Father is not confined within the limits of the Church. It is the clear teaching of the Acts of the Apostles, as it is the experience of missionaries, that the Spirit goes, so to speak, ahead of the church.”[3]

The challenge brought to The Edge is a willingness for all of our leadership to seek inspiration not solely from its internal practices of The Edge and our Cultural Discipling Rhythms, but from those outside of its identity who might be of like-mindedness. While maintaining the cultural discipling rhythms of Investing, Involving, and Inspiring, we can find inspiration and wisdom from other missionally focused movements that might strengthen, build, and equip our own covenantal practices and understandings of them. Holding our own beliefs and practices in open form to the greater community of missional groups, not only creates a communicative dialogue between movements that would shape our own, but also open doors of collaboration and the ability for us to shape other movements around us. This is not dismissing the solidarity of our own cultural rhythms in discipleship but rather transcending them to the greater movement of the mission of God as a whole.

In the practicalities of this we need to explore the questions of what are the other missional movements around us that resonate with our own? How might we begin a dialogue with them towards mutual collaboration? Are we willing to let them speak into our cultural rhythms in the pursuit of “dreaming dreams and seeing visions”? What practices of accountability would we expect upon our leadership in participation?

[1] Kouzes, James M., and Barry Z. Posner. The Leadership Challenge. 3rd ed. (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002) Pg. #145.

[2] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (Ac 2:17). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.

[3] Bevans, Stephen B., and Roger Schroeder. Constants in Context: A Theology of Mission for Today. (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2004) Pg. #297.

Further Steps Towards The Edge – Pt. #3 – Creating a Central Unity for a Culture of Rhythms in Discipling

Heart RhythmsOver the last several months Desmond Tutu’s words from his book ‘No Future Without Forgiveness’ has been resonating in my thoughts. He said, “‘My humanity is caught up, is inextricably bound up, in yours.’ We belong in a bundle of life. We say, ‘A person is a person through other persons.’ It is not, ‘I think therefore I am.’ It says rather: ‘I am human because I belong. I participate, I share.’”[1] It is a natural rhythm of breathing in and out the life presence of Jesus as we find a sort of organic communal covenant relationship with him that begins our discipling practices and says we belong both to him and to each other.

So what are the rhythms that we practice to which announce our belonging to The Edge Movement? There seems to be three spheres of discipleship that naturally form in our culture. While each may find different expressions between the tribes, The Edge focuses around the converging practices of Investing, Involving, and Inspiring the lives of its members. It is difficult to state a defining place of beginning in such a process as each sphere coexists with the other and yet each element of the three begins a radical transformation of the disciple and the community to become more entwined in the reflective life of Jesus.

Edge Discipling RhythmsThe challenge brought forth to The Edge is to recognize the interdependence we have on one another in following these rhythms. Each needs to be dynamically broadened in depth and understanding and each must be communicatively interlinked within the entire movement itself and between all the tribes. We must recognize and see them in practice through the entire network and not limited to just a limited few or solely in the leadership. How might we as collaborative leaders develop these rhythms further? How might we develop interlinking ligaments that foster stronger relationships between each tribe and between the tribal leaders?

The importance of tribal harmony is detrimental to the transmission and communicative contextualization of our discipling cultural rhythms. In Bevans and Schroeder’s words, “Like a complex fugue or polyphonic motet, God’s unity is constituted by diversity and God’s diversity is rooted in unity of will and purpose; the church is the church inasmuch as it has been included in that harmony.”[2] As leaders in The Edge, we must make the effort to not only find a listening ear to that which God is doing in our own tribe, but also find interlinking relationships with other leaders in the movement to hear the harmony in which God is creating with the surrounding tribes. If we only are listening to our individual tribal identities and practices at the exclusion of the others, we could very easily lose track of the communal rhythm and become nothing but “a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal”[3] in the midst of a struggling symphony. As God’s mission began in love for the other (John 3:16), so must ours, as we love those who we are a part of.

[1] Tutu, Desmond. No Future Without Forgiveness. (New York: Doubleday, 1999) Kindle Location 431.

[2] Bevans, Stephen B., and Roger Schroeder. Constants in Context: A Theology of Mission for Today. (Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2004) Pg. #298.

[3] [3] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. (2001). (1 Cor. 13:1). Wheaton: Standard Bible Society.